Twenty music – Puro Veinte http://puroveinte.com/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:30:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://puroveinte.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.png Twenty music – Puro Veinte http://puroveinte.com/ 32 32 Green Room: airport mural, music from the hills, light art https://puroveinte.com/green-room-airport-mural-music-from-the-hills-light-art/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:30:16 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/green-room-airport-mural-music-from-the-hills-light-art/ The art of parks Local artist Lucinda Penn (aka LCND) has created a colorful new mural at Adelaide Airport to celebrate South Australia’s transformation into a national park city. The works, at gate 18, were launched yesterday afternoon during an event marking the end of National Park Town Month. Professor Chris Daniels of Green Adelaide, […]]]>

The art of parks

Local artist Lucinda Penn (aka LCND) has created a colorful new mural at Adelaide Airport to celebrate South Australia’s transformation into a national park city.

The works, at gate 18, were launched yesterday afternoon during an event marking the end of National Park Town Month.

Professor Chris Daniels of Green Adelaide, who commissioned the mural, believes it will raise awareness of the National Park City movement and help promote Greater Adelaide globally as “a city that connects people and with nature”.

The international National Park City Foundation awarded Adelaide National Park City status last year, making it the second city, after London, to receive the honor.

“My piece depicts Adelaide in an abstract and colorful way, from the hills to the sea: from a vision of a platypus in the Torrens, to our iconic hill landscape, and parks and vineyards and the Mall’s Balls,” says Penn. .

The young artist has previously created public murals in places such as Adelaide Central Market, Festival Plaza and Rundle Street U Park, as well as wineries and residential spaces. One of his other recent projects was a mural at the Grace Emily Hotel which served as the backdrop for his fundraising in Ukraine.

International artists return to UKARIA

Thirty-one artists and six ensembles will perform at the UKARIA Cultural Center during its winter-summer 2022 season as the Adelaide Hills venue once again welcomes international musicians for the first time since the pandemic began.

British violinist Lawrence Power.

The 21-concert programme, launched today, features nine international artists. Among them is acclaimed British violinist Lawrence Power, who will host the flagship UKARIA 24 October long weekend including five concerts crossing the music of the 17e century to contemporary works, with Power joined by colleagues from Norway, Sweden and Italy, as well as artists from Australia.

The season will open on August 19 with a concert by flamenco guitarist Paco Peña and brothers Slava and Leonard Grigoryan which promises to showcase “the precision and artistry of the acoustic guitar in a collaboration that combines the fiery flourishes of flamenco with the harmonies and colorful tones of classical music”.

Other artists on the program include Finnish pianist Olli Mustonen, who will perform a concert of works by Beethoven and Bach, as well as a twilight recital with violinist Richard Tognetti; international bassist Avishai Cohen and his Avishai Cohen Trio, who will headline the Melbourne International Jazz Festival in Australia in October; the Australian String Quartet; R&B/soul singer Ngaire, in collaboration with Paul Grabowsky; and singers Lior and Domini, whose show hidden animal was a highlight of the recent Adelaide Cabaret Festival.

UKARIA’s full winter-summer 2022 season is on line.

Shedding light on art and science

Most Adelaidens will have heard of Ouchhh Studio, the Istanbul-based new media artists and designers who bring their Wisdom of AI Light multi-sensory experience at a large pop-up venue in the East End during Illuminate Adelaide.

Ouch describes himself as a pioneer of data paintings and sculptures, and for Wisdom of AI Light he trained his artificial intelligence to analyze billions of brushstrokes from Renaissance painters such as Leonardo da Vinci to create a new work of immersive Renaissance-style moving images. The second part of the exhibition features works from his other projects, including a 3D projection made in collaboration with NASA.

Studio Co-Head Ferdi Alici is coming to Adelaide for Illuminate, and in a talk presented jointly by the festival and Guildhouse at Light on July 18, he will discuss the process of creating cutting-edge works at the intersection of art , science and technology. . The conference, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., is free and tickets can be reserved here.

Illuminate Adelaide runs throughout July, with the light cycles Night Experience in the Botanical Gardens and luminous creatures at Adelaide Zoo from July 7.

lookalike and zombies

Innovative use of 21stTechnology of the Century also sheds new light on valuable works of art in the new David Roche Foundation exhibition: Lookalike and Zombies.

The exhibition features a collection of new physical and digital works – described as “astonishingly playful and highly crafted” – which have been created from 3D scans of pieces from David Roche’s 18th and 19th century.e-century collection of decorative arts objects.

Techniques such as 3D printing, 360-degree photography, photogrammetry and digital modeling were used to create the pieces, some of which are manipulated to play with the viewer’s perception. Works include augmented reality Doppelgangerfor which visitors will receive a QR code that will allow them to view it later on their portable devices at home.

Rochus Hinkel and Melissa Iraheta, Fabulations – Manticore, excerpt from a video animation, after Thomas Hope, X-frame stool. Courtesy of the University of Melbourne.

Dr Rochus Hinkel, associate professor at the Melbourne School of Design and co-director of the Advanced Digital Design and Fabrication research group at the University of Melbourne, led the research and development behind lookalike and zombies and will present an artist talk at UniSA’s Hawke Building on July 22, as well as artist tours of the exhibition the following day. There will also be an auction of collectibles and NFTs (non-fungible tokens) on display at lookalike and zombies July 23. Tickets for these free finishing events can be reserved here.

lookalike and zombies is presented at the museum from July 1 to 23.

In other words

Jennifer Wang.

Writer, comedian and “foodie” Jennifer Wong – ABC TV presenter Chopsticks or Fork – has been appointed curator of the writing and ideas program In Other Words 2022 of the OzAsia Festival.

In Other Words was introduced as part of the OzAsia program last year (replacing the JLF Adelaide events held in 2018-19), with the 2021 lineup curated by former Adelaide Writers’ Week director Laura Kroetsch.

For this year’s event, Wong will work with guest curators Marc Fennell and Beverly Wang.

“As a former Asian Studies student with a passion for books and involved in Asian-Australian performance since 2011, I am delighted that In Other Words is the perfect place to celebrate and bring together the incredible array of Asian talent in Australia. . ,” she says. “Whether it’s music or journalism, science or literature, cooking or pop culture, we’ve got you covered…we bring together thinkers and writers from all walks of life who will inspire, will provoke and comfort.”

The lineup for In Other Words will be unveiled in September, while the lineup for the rest of the OzAsia festival (October 20 – November 6) will be announced in early August. Wong, who created and hosted The Special Comedy Special in 2021, will also appear in this year’s festival comedy special.

A new festival in search of emerging composers

Emerging composers from South Australia are being offered the opportunity to get involved in a new music festival to be held over three Sundays in November.

The ReClassified Festival will be presented by Adelaide Recitals Australiawith President Mark de Raad saying it’s about “reflecting and celebrating our city’s living and breathing classical music creators”.

Expressions of interest are sought (here) emerging composers interested in producing a new chamber work for the festival; successful applicants will have their pieces worked on in the studio under the direction of Anne Cawrse and other established composers, then performed and recorded live as part of ReClassified.

Professional musicians involved with the festival include Dean Newcomb (clarinet), Mitch Berick (clarinet/bass clarinet), Joshua Oates (oboe), Martin Alexander (viola), Tom Marlin (cello), Josh van Konkelenberg (organ), Cheryl Pickering (mezzo soprano), Melanie Walters (flute) and Helen Ayres (violin). November Festival performances will take place at the North Adelaide Baptist Church and Hall, Stangate House in Aldgate and Z-Ward in Glenside.

Green Room is a regular column for InReview, providing fast-paced news for those interested or involved in South Australian arts and culture.

Contact us by writing to us at eeditorial@solsticemedia.com.au

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Imagine Dragons tops this week’s new music releases https://puroveinte.com/imagine-dragons-tops-this-weeks-new-music-releases/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/imagine-dragons-tops-this-weeks-new-music-releases/ Independence Day weekend brings new musical releases from indie bands such as Fleet Foxes, Shinedown, Gray Daze and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, while hit regular Imagine Dragons has a sequel (all likely to to change)… Album of the week: Imagine Dragons haven’t wasted much time between their last two albums. Just 10 months after “Mercury […]]]>

Independence Day weekend brings new musical releases from indie bands such as Fleet Foxes, Shinedown, Gray Daze and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, while hit regular Imagine Dragons has a sequel (all likely to to change)…

Album of the week: Imagine Dragons haven’t wasted much time between their last two albums. Just 10 months after “Mercury — Act 1” made its Billboard Top 10 debut, “Mercury — Acts 1 & 2” (KIDinaKORNER/Interscope) completes the story, with the new second part featuring 18 other songs written by the quartet and a set of collaborators. Rick Rubin once again serves as executive producer, and former Snarky Puppy member Cory Henry features on the track “Continual.”

Title of the album of the week: Light Creates Shadow, “Ghosts Cross, Fleeing the Body” (self-published)

Did you know ? : The Prog Collective – releasing “Songs We Were Taught” (Cleopatra) this week – is fronted by Yes bassist Billy Sherwood and features his bandmates as well as past and present members from Asia, the Doobie Brothers, Steely Dan , Jethro Tull, the Moody Blues, Wishbone Ash, the E Street Band and more on 10 60s and 70s favorites from Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, James Taylor, The Band and more.

New and remarkable:

Paul Anka, “Sessions” (Green Hill Productions)

Fleet Foxes, “A Very Lonely Solstice” (anti-/epitaph)

Gray Daze, “The Phoenix” (Loma Vista/Concord)

Paolo Nutini, “Last Night in the Bittersweet” (Atlantic)

Saint Asonia, “Introverted” (Spinefarm)

Shinedown, “Planet Zero” (Atlantic)

Tedeschi Trucks Band, “I am the moon: II. Ascension » (Fantasy/Concorde)

Noah Weiland, “Last Kiss Before Detox” (self-published)

Hot New Singles: Cardi B, “Hot S—” with Kanye West and Lil Durk; Jeff Beck and Johnny Depp, “Caroline, no;” BI and Chuu, “Lullaby;” Brandi and the Alexanders, “Watch Yourself Dance”; Katrina Cain, “Independence Day;” Eminem and Snoop Dog, “From D 2 to LBC”; First aid kit, “Angel;” The play, “Violence;” Gorillaz, “Cracker Island” with Thundercat; Darren Hayes, “Poisoned Blood”; Tyler Hubbard, “35; » Sam Hunt, “Water Under the Bridge”; J-Hope, “More”; King’s X, “Let It Rain”; Lady A, “Summer State of Mind”; Maddie & Tae, “Every Night, Every Morning;” Pamela McNeill, “Hollywood Rain”; need to breathe, “Talk about the city”; Ozzy Osbourne, “Patient Number 9” with Jeff Beck; Pale waves, “Jealousy”; Queensryche, “In Extremis”; Raye, “Hard Out Here”; Sweet Lizzy Project, “Pirate Radio” / “Radio Pirata;” Taylor Swift, “Carolina”; Teddy Swims and Meghan Trainor, “Bad for Me”; Tiesto and Charli XCX, “Hot In It”; Loudon Wainwright, “A Life’s Work;” Willow,” It’s My Fault;” Rita Wilson, “Songbird” with Josh Groban; Zac Brown Band, “Out in the Middle” with Blake Shelton; Warren Zeiders and Travis Barker, “Ride the Lightning”

Also released:

Naomi Alligator, “Double Knot” (Parking)

Tony Baltimore, “Let’s All Go Crazy” (Conch Town)

The Boppers, “White Lightning” (self-produced)

Bob Burger, “The Domino Effect” (JEM)

Burna Boy, “Love, Damini” (Spaceship/Bad Habit/Atlantic)

Classless Act, “Welcome to the Show” (self-released)

Drone Congregation, “Twenty Twenty” (all recordings possible)

Mark of Clive-Low & Friends, “Celebrating the Music of Pharoah Sanders” (Soul Bank Music)

Ina Forsman, “It’s All There” (Jazzhaus)

Ghost Woman, “Ghost Woman” (full-time hobby)

Eric Hilton, “Los Dialect” (music by Monstserrat)

ITZY, “checkmate” (JYP)

JD Huggins, “Head Full of Monsters” (Angels and Outlaws)

Kollpas, “Till the Day I Die” (Cold Spring)

Kolumbo, “Gung Ho” (Calico Discos)

Charles Lloyd, “Trios: Chapel” (Blue Note)

Muni Long, “Public displays of affection too” (Supergiant/Def Jam)

Parade of mice, “lapapo” (Bubble Core)

Kyle Morgan, “PS” (EMI Nashville)

Mothica, “nocturnal” (heavy heart)

Neighbor, “For the Birds” (Park the Van)

Nova Materia, “Xpujil Revisited” (stuffed discs)

Orthodox, “Continue” (Alone)

Philosophobia, “philosophobia” (sensory)

Clay “Krucial” Perry III, “Clay” (Warner)

Power Pose, “I’m Watching” (Wine n Orange)

Radian, “Discordian” (Elburno)

RZN8R, “Closing the Golden Gate” (self-released)

Klaus Schulze, “Deus Arrakis” (SPV)

Derek Sherinian, “Vortex” (InsideOut Music)

Spiritbox, “Rotoscope” (self-produced)

Teddy and the Rough Riders, “Teddy and the Rough Riders” (Appalachia Record Co.)

Winter Wolf, “Winter Wolf” (Academic Punk)

From the vaults:

The Chantels, “The Complete Singles & Albums 1957-1962” (Acrobat)

The Judds, “Love Can Build a Bridge: Best of the Judds” (Curb)

King Parrot, “The Stink of Hardcore Pub Trash” (Housecore)

Linda Gail Laws, “Early Sides 1963-1973” (Cleopatra)

John McLaughlin, Al Di Meolo and Paco De Lucio, “Saturday Night in San Francisco” (earMusic)

Liza Minnelli, “Live in New York 1979 (The Ultimate Edition)” (Second Disc/Real Gone Music)

Seether, “Si Vis Pacem, By Bellum (Deluxe Edition)” (Fantasy)

Necrophobic, “satanic blasphemies” (Century Media)

Nonconnah, “Don’t Go Down to Lonesome Holler” (Ernest Jenning Record Co.)

Roxy Music, “Flesh + Blood” and “Avalon” (Virgin/UMe)

Melvin Van Peebles, “Watermelon Man” (Real Gone)

Spear of Fate, “Liberators! Best of 1983-1988″ (Edsel/Demon)

Doris Troy, “Just a Look and Other Memorable Selections” (Real Gone)

Soundtracks:

“Kingdom Business: Season 1 Soundtrack” (RCA Inspiration)

“Minions: The Rise of Gru (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)” (Decca)

“My Best Friend’s Wedding (25th Anniversary Edition)” (Real Gone)

“Stranger Things: Original Netflix Series Soundtrack, Season 4, Volume 2” (Legacy)

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Zach Bryan, Kaitlin Butts and Corey Kent of Oklahoma drive up the country music charts | Tulsa World Magazine https://puroveinte.com/zach-bryan-kaitlin-butts-and-corey-kent-of-oklahoma-drive-up-the-country-music-charts-tulsa-world-magazine/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/zach-bryan-kaitlin-butts-and-corey-kent-of-oklahoma-drive-up-the-country-music-charts-tulsa-world-magazine/ Tulsa World Magazine picked out three up-and-coming country artists from Oklahoma that you’ll want to keep an eye out for as their music career progresses. Zach Bryan “Here’s your sign” is comedian Bill Engvall’s signature catchphrase. Here’s Your Sign Singer-songwriter Zach Bryan was about to “explode” in the music business: He sold out two Cain’s […]]]>

Tulsa World Magazine picked out three up-and-coming country artists from Oklahoma that you’ll want to keep an eye out for as their music career progresses.

Zach Bryan

“Here’s your sign” is comedian Bill Engvall’s signature catchphrase.

Here’s Your Sign Singer-songwriter Zach Bryan was about to “explode” in the music business: He sold out two Cain’s Ballroom shows in the blink of an eye, and he was still six months away from his debut on a major label. He also sold out the historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville in less than an hour through word of mouth and the strength of his gear and live performances.






Zach Bryan, featured at an April performance at the Calf Fry in Stillwater, released his Warner Records debut album in May.


Mike Simons World of Tulsa


Bryan served in the United States Navy before winning the ears and hearts of music fans. His highly anticipated album ‘American Heartbreak’ is out May 20 via Warner Records, and he’ll be among the headliners when he returns to the Born & Raised Music Festival on September 16 in Pryor, a short drive from his hometown of Oologah.

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Bryan is proud of his small-town roots and his music is fueled by a desire to stay true to himself, according to a biography provided by Warner Records.







Fried Veal Zach Bryan

Music fans react to Zach Bryan’s performance at the 2022 Calf Fry Music Festival in Stillwater.


Photos by Mike Simons, Tulsa World Magazine


“Her success is found in her raspy voice, a blend of classic folk melody and outlaw country with a raw edge that cuts to the bone,” said the biography, which cited a defining moment in his career.

“In the ‘Heading South’ video, shot by phone outside his Marine barracks in humid 95-degree heat, Bryan’s passion echoes through the strings of his trusted guild. Soaked in sweat and words he wrote minutes earlier, the moment is authentic, brutal and real Millions of fans have now seen this video without any kind of industry help and millions more have tuned in to the songs heartfelt tenderness found on both Bryan’s 2019 debut album ‘DeAnn’ – dedicated to his late mother – and its 2020 follow-up, ‘Elisabeth,’ an ode to those he loves.

Bryan has amassed over a billion combined global streams, with 4 million monthly Spotify listeners.

To learn more about him, visit zachbryan.com.

Kaitlin’s Butts

A Union High School alum, Butts released an album (“What Else Can She Do”) in April that earned her recognition from Rolling Stone and other music news sources.







Kaitlin's Butts

Kaitlin Butts is on a positive streak in 2022. Mackenzie Ryan


Jimmie Tramel



On the day of the album’s release, Rolling Stone said this about the title track: “What Else Can She Do”, recently released by Kaitlin Butts, clearly demonstrates that she should be positioned somewhere between Miranda Lambert or Kacey Musgraves at country’s vanguard – an Oklahoma native with a big, malleable voice and the songwriting skills to match.

Billboard said Butts’ new album “highlights her most powerful, scariest voice.”

Momentum began to build before the album’s release when Butts was one of seven artists featured in a nationwide U.S. Cellular “Locally Grown, Locally Live” campaign.







Kaitlin's Butts

“What Else Can She Do” is Kaitlin Butts’ second studio album.


Courtesy, MacKenzie Ryan


‘What Else Can She Do’ is Butts’ second studio album and his first since 2015’s ‘Same Hell, Different Devil’.

The tracks on the new album tell the stories of women – those who are lost, struggling, angry and scared, but who remain resilient through it all.

“I don’t think life is that pretty sometimes, and with it comes pain and going through tough times, being stagnant, going with the flow, not knowing what to do or just being downright mad at everything life has put on your plate,” Butts said in a press release about the album.

“I see myself in all these women in these stories. I see these women in my friends and family all around me going through divorce, abuse, infidelity, financial instability, addiction, generational trauma, family issues and tough life changing times, but somehow they are still resilient and come out the other side okay. I hope this album makes you feel seen and comforts you in dark times. Know that you are never alone and will not always be so.

Butts said each song on the album was like a different movie in his head. She shared the visuals through a series of lyric videos that were released in May.

For more information and to find out the next tour dates, go to kaitlinbutts.com.

Corey Kent

You knew him as Corey Kent White when he was coached by Blake Shelton on “The Voice.”

Now you can call him Corey Kent, musical artist with a #1 song.

Kent’s “Wild as Her” soared to No. 1 on Apple Music’s Country Streaming chart earlier this year. It’s from his album “’21,” which was released in December 2021 and debuted at No. 4 on the US Spotify chart.







Corey Kent

Corey Kent will be among the performers at the Born & Raised Music Festival 2022.


TOM GILBERT, Tulsa World magazine file


Kent told social media followers in April that he had his best touring year last year by self-booking, and he announced he was teaming up with Nate Towne and Hayley Riddle at William Morris Endeavor to level up. They work in collaboration with his Triple 8 Management team.

Want to see for yourself what Corey Kent is all about? He will perform on September 18 at the Born & Raised Music Festival in Pryor. He posted this on social media after the performance slate was announced: “The only thing cooler than playing a festival called Born & Raised Music Festival less than an hour from where you were born and raised. grown up, is to move from the limelight stage last year to a major milestone this year.







Corey Kent White

Corey Kent performing at Cain’s Ballroom in 2016.


Tulsa World Magazine File


To learn more about him, visit coreykentofficial.com.

Tulsa World Magazine Summer Edition

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Music and festivals at the center of attention | Grand Island Local News https://puroveinte.com/music-and-festivals-at-the-center-of-attention-grand-island-local-news/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/music-and-festivals-at-the-center-of-attention-grand-island-local-news/ Get ready to celebrate this weekend! Whether it’s “Strong in a Small Town” in Ansley, “Bring on the Rain” in Callaway or Mardi Gras in Aurora, it’s time to party. If it’s music you’re after, the Flatwater Music Festival west of Hastings kicks off tonight, and of course, it’s Hear Grand Island’s fourth week. If […]]]>

Get ready to celebrate this weekend!

Whether it’s “Strong in a Small Town” in Ansley, “Bring on the Rain” in Callaway or Mardi Gras in Aurora, it’s time to party.

If it’s music you’re after, the Flatwater Music Festival west of Hastings kicks off tonight, and of course, it’s Hear Grand Island’s fourth week.

If you’re ready to get moving, Hear Grand Island will give you the pace to do so.

With bands from Denver, Lincoln and Omaha on stage, Railside Plaza will rock Friday night.

Public Figure of Omaha, playing “alternative punk and pop”, and Universe Contest of Lincoln, offering “static punk rock”, open the ball. The headliner of the event is Inthewhale, a hard rock duo from Denver. As the duo asks on their Facebook page: “Nebraska, are you ready to butt heads?” Pack your earplugs. We’ll see you soon!”

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Doors open at 6 p.m. and music plays from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. DJesse from Broken Bow will serve as the DJ on duty for the evening.

This show for all ages is free; bring lawn chairs if you wish. The Summer Concert Series runs every Friday evening until August 5.

For more information, see the Hear Grand Island page on Facebook.

Flatwater Music Festival, Hastings

HASTINGS – The 15th annual Flatwater Music Festival takes place Friday and Saturday at the Prairie Loft Center for Outdoor and Agricultural Learning in Hastings.

The hours are from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Friday and from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday.

The main stage performances are set to a revamped trailer with roots that go back to USO performances in Nebraska. The festival takes place against the backdrop of agricultural fields. Mainstage concerts will feature award-winning bands from Nebraska and Colorado.

New Saturday events include the Family Magic Show with Mr. Magic Myers at 3:30 p.m. The Ukulele Jamboree with Hastings Community Music Academy will follow at 4 p.m.

Family areas include a sandpit, mud kitchen, natural playground, wooded trail, art activities, and lawn games.

All concerts, activities and workshops are included in the $10 admission (kids 10 and under admitted free). Food and drinks are available for purchase. Visitors can also shop for home decor, jewelry, art, face painting, henna art, and more in the historic barn.

There will be a variety of dishes from food trucks, as well as beer and kombucha from Hastings breweries.

Bring a lawn chair to enjoy the concerts. No smoking or vaping, no pets, no food or drink outside, please. Please carpool.

The planned main stage includes:

— 7 p.m. Emily Bass and the near-miracle

— 9 p.m. Rascal Martinez

— 2:00 p.m. The String Beans family concert

— 7 p.m.: The Cody Sisters

— 9 p.m.: The Talbott Brothers (presented by Pinnacle Bank of Hastings and Five Points Bank of Hastings)

Proceeds from the event support the educational programs of Prairie Loft, which organizes and hosts the event.

Prairie Loft is an independent, non-profit organization whose mission is to teach appreciation for agriculture, outdoor education, cultural connections and the wise use of natural resources.

For more information and a full schedule, visit www.prairieloft.org or check out Prairie Loft’s Facebook page.

Prairie Loft Center is located at 4705 DLD Road in West Hastings. To get there, take Second Street West from Burlington Avenue, cross Marian Road, then turn south on Highland. Just after crossing the train tracks, turn west on DLD Road and drive a quarter mile.

‘A’Ror’N Days, Aurora

AURORA – And you thought Mardi Gras was months ago!

Well, technically it was, but if you couldn’t make it to New Orleans for the big party, you can catch up this weekend in Aurora.

A’Ror’N Days, an annual celebration hosted by the Aurora Chamber of Commerce, kicked off Thursday and will continue through Sunday.

The Grand Parade is scheduled for Saturday noon, with a line-up starting at 10:30 a.m. at Aurora High School. A fireworks display begins at sunset Saturday at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds.

Other highlights of the Mardi Gras-themed weekend include:

Friday: Show and Shine Car Show, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; pork barbecue, 5 p.m., courthouse lawn; street dancing and outdoor film.

Saturday: Pancake Food, 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., airport; Craft and Vendor Fair, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Bremer Center; children’s activities and sports tournaments; and a street dance featuring Bases Loaded, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Grandview.

Sunday: Orphan Grain Train burgers and brats, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 4-H building at the fairgrounds; and activities at the Edgerton Explorit Center, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Aurora is located approximately 20 miles east of Grand Island on Highway 34. For a full schedule of events, check out the A’Ror’N Days page on Facebook.

Nimble Thimble Quilt Guild Show, Aurora

AURORA — As part of the A’Ror’N Days program, the Nimble Thimble Quilt Guild will host its annual show, “How It Began…How It Happens,” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Plainsman Museum, 210 16th St.

This year, “How It Began” quilts will be presented by several young quilt artists from the community. Participants will have the chance to meet the artists at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday. Following the theme “How it started…”, members of the quilting guild will also share their beginner sewing projects. Their “How’s It Going” quilts will showcase the skills they’ve learned over the years. Special quilts will also be on display in remembrance of recently deceased member Maxine Bergen.

A highlight of the show will be Quilts of Valor presented to local veterans at 10 a.m. Saturday. The quilts are made by guild members, with funding from the Hamilton Community Foundation.

Members of the Quilt Guild will share these programs during the show:

Thursday: Carrés de charme and more, 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. – Civil War quilts, 1:30 p.m.

Friday: Simplify cutting with the AccuQuilt Go machine, 10 a.m.; and Civil War quilts, 1:30 p.m.

A country store with ‘quilty’ items for sale and light refreshments complete the show. A $5 admission fee covers admission for all three days.

– “Strong in a Strong Town”, annual celebration of Muddy Creek, until Sunday, Ansley. Events include a parade (11 a.m. Saturday), games and activities for kids, an art exhibit, entertainment, food and more. Information: Muddy Creek Celebration on Facebook. Note: Ansley is located in Custer County, approximately one hour from Grand Island.

– Annual Callaway Pioneer Picnic, through Sunday, Morgan Park, Callaway. The event includes a parade (Saturday at 10:45 a.m.; the theme is “Bring the Rain”), alumni banquet, children’s activities and games, car show, train rides in Morgan Park, street dances and a rodeo. Information/hours: Callaway Chamber of Commerce on Facebook. Note: Callaway is also located in Custer County, approximately 45 miles west of Ansley.

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What is American Music? Three classic albums offer answers. https://puroveinte.com/what-is-american-music-three-classic-albums-offer-answers/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:00:06 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/what-is-american-music-three-classic-albums-offer-answers/ What is American classical music, exactly? When crafting their answers, programmers have always chosen one of two approaches: cautious, piecemeal efforts or a risky, all-in-one merge. The piecemeal strategy might admit that elements of jazz composers like Duke Ellington were to be in the mix, but as a separate concert or album, rather than with […]]]>

What is American classical music, exactly? When crafting their answers, programmers have always chosen one of two approaches: cautious, piecemeal efforts or a risky, all-in-one merge.

The piecemeal strategy might admit that elements of jazz composers like Duke Ellington were to be in the mix, but as a separate concert or album, rather than with the fully notated and regularly performed works of Gershwin or Bernstein. The merger approach was heard much less frequently. But it existed. In 1976, American pianist Frederic Rzewski offered listeners an inventive mix of two differently scored piano pieces by saxophonist and improviser Anthony Braxton – plus a sonata by German-born composer Hanns Eisler and his own “No Place to Go but Around “- in a dizzying recital.

This concept, once experimental, is now one that the general classical public sometimes manages to adopt, as on a recent album by violinist Daniel Hope, “America”. Experimenters are still doing fusion too – like on the PUBLIQuartet string quartet’s new version, “What Is American”. A third way — to commission entirely new music — is demonstrated in another recording, violinist Johnny Gandelsman’s three-disc sprawling “This Is America,” due out July 1.

Hope’s album is proof that the fusion approach is not necessarily easy. On his recording, released earlier this year on the Deutsche Grammophon label, he valiantly tries Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come” as well as “Come Sunday”, from Ellington’s “Black, Brown and Beige”. (Mainstays of a more framed American repertoire, such as works by Bernstein and Copland, are also on the program.)

In the Cooke, Hope’s tone is pleasant enough – if a bit too pale to match the soul of Joy Denalane’s voice. But the extract of Ellington is a missed opportunity, with an opening too fast.

Judge this reading against a 1958 Ellington recording in which violinist Ray Nance relishes the same melodic material for an additional 10 seconds, after his entry. There’s a reason you don’t move quickly through sentences; extra seconds can mean everything.

On Hope’s album, the best performances come early, when he tackles a handful of Gershwin tracks. Here he invites a trio led by pianist Marcus Roberts to help him with improvisations and the American swing idiom. Their participation inspires fiery playing from Hope, whose tone dances happily during “Fascinating Rhythm.” (He also plays bluesy double-stops over drummer Jason Marsalis’ beats near the end of “Summertime.”)

However, the collaboration between Hope, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra and the Roberts Trio remains unfailingly polite, the latter being visibly tighter. streaming to this ensemble’s digital concert hallin which the Roberts Trio has been engaged for a bold and advanced reading of Gerswhin’s Concerto in F.

“America” ​​seems to be aware that this could be a problem. On the cover, Hope is seen dressed in a waistcoat and a tuxedo, and leaning against a vintage car parked in front of a building whose windows are decorated with portraits of great American musicians. But the artists pictured in these window frames don’t quite follow the sound of the album. There is not a single passage that has the explosive quality of saxophonist and bass clarinetist Eric Dolphy’s ecstatic hopscotch between registers and timbres. So what’s he doing in the album cover?

Beyond his own music, Dolphy emerged as a key soloist in the civil rights-era musical essays of bassist and composer Charles Mingus, particularly in “Original Fables of Faubus” and “Meditations on Integration.” Yet the protest poetry of Dolphy and John Coltrane – another artist pictured on the cover of “America” ​​- is not present here beyond the title of Cooke’s promising pop song for change.

As a result, Hope’s album does not musically confront the troubled state of the union, nor does it acknowledge past revolutions in this country’s ever-evolving jazz tradition. The fiery music that Coltrane and Dolphy played in 1961 was criticized at the time as “anti-jazz” in some quarters – a take that hasn’t aged well. But while Hope seems eager to quote the fire of American ingenuity on an album cover, he doesn’t want to get scorched by it in practice.

The opposite is true for long periods of Gandelsman “This is America” project, an ambitious ensemble that tries to take the national temperature by soliciting new solo works from a group of twenty composers. In his liner notes for the album, the violinist cites a host of issues as inspirations for his impetus to commission these pieces: the pandemic; the police brutality and death of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd and Breonna Taylor; the more than four million acres of California forests lost to wildfires in 2020; unemployment; “the rhetoric of the vicious electoral cycle.”

Many composers responded to Gandelsman’s prompt with a similar sense of overwhelming dread and sadness. Fair enough. But as a listening experience, the nearly four-hour program could have used more works like “Sahra be Wyckoff,” by Syrian-born clarinetist and composer Kinan Azmeh. Written for a time when it was difficult for friends and artistic collaborators to get together, it recalls a happier past of jam sessions in Brooklyn. Gandelsman’s intoxicating performance sent me back to Azmeh’s impressive 2021 album “Flow”, recorded with Germany’s NDR Bigband. This ensemble is another example of the ability of American energies to change – with Ellingtonian orchestration merging with melodic Middle Eastern modes.

Otherwise, the pieces Gandelsman received tend towards darker moods and subject matter – including a memorial to a deceased friend and multiple meditations on civic strife. And some pieces reflect the composers’ long-standing concerns. So when Tyshawn Sorey offers the contemplative (and sometimes ferocious) “For Courtney Bryan,” the miniature may serve as a small but important addition to the composer’s rapidly expanding catalog of prismatic tributes to his musical contemporaries. But “For Courtney Bryan” is only lightly engaged with Gandelsman’s stated hope that the commissions “in some way reflect the times we all lived in.” (For Sorey’s more specific thoughts on our moment, you could turn to his searing “Save the Boys” since last year.)

Yet everything is played with precision; Gandelsman listens to the precise nature of each artist and adapts his sound to each. The second disc offers a rush of contrast in composition and interpretative effort. Here you’ll find Angélica Negrón’s dreamy ode to childhood stargazing (“A Través del Manto Luminoso”), where Gandelsman’s direct, fluty sound merges seamlessly with the electronic backing track.

Ebun Oguntola’s dark but mysterious ‘Reflections’ push Gandelsman towards contrasts of arc pressure, suggesting unpredictable twists and turns of an individual’s mind. On Tomeka Reid’s sing-song then virtuoso “Rhapsody,” his dynamic changes are more fluid in nature – and quietly impressive. And Gandelsman brings a charming quality of free association to his take on Terry Riley’s “Barbary Coast 1955” episode.

Kaleidoscopic invention in these courses of works throughout the PUBLIQuartet “What is the American“, my favorite classical album of the year so far. It features award-winning arrangements by Dvorak, as well as “Black Coffee” by Tina Turner and the Ornette Coleman tracks “Law Years” and “Street Woman”. There’s a nodding performance by Vijay Iyer’s String Quartet “Dig Say It” (itself inspired by James Brown).

And there’s a newly commissioned string quartet, “CARDS 11.11.20”, by Roscoe Mitchell – the composer-saxophonist who rose to prominence in the 1960s, alongside Braxton and other members of the Association for the advancement of creative musicians. Like other works in Mitchell’s “Cards” series, this entirely composed effort invites improvisation (the musicians being allowed to mix in fragments of the score, at some point during the performance); the players of the PUBLIQuartet sound at ease in this typically American challenge.

Winding among these and other works are the fractured quartet recitations of Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.’s obscure fifth verse to “The Star-Spangled Banner.” In the midst of the Civil War, this poet – and the father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. – excoriated “the traitor who dares to defile / The flag of its stars and the page of its history!” (Think of this in the context of the January 6 rioter who carried the Confederate flag inside the US Capitol building, and who was recently sentenced one felony and four misdemeanors.)

Never overloaded, “What Is American” packs fun, eclecticism and civic engagement into the length of a single CD. The album’s ability to weave together multiple traditions reaches its apex in its sweeping but recognizable adaptation of Dvorak’s String Quartet No. black Americans like Harry Burleigh (as well as Native American Melody).

We have dozens of pristine and accurate renditions of this warhorse; PUBLIQuartet players have rightly guessed that it can handle a bit of reinvention. Their performance represents, they note, “improvisations” on the work. They practically draw and tear apart the first and second themes of the opening movement, introducing or developing them with rough and coarse accents.

Before the final recap of the move on these themes, players give us a prickly moment. Having completed their version of the development, they perform a downshift in tempo before collectively improvising in a high appeal blues mode.

Seconds later, when the band turns to Dvorak’s American-inspired sound, there’s a new idea missing from other albums with similar aspirations: a suggestion that group dynamics, as much as individual interpretations , are essential to American music. It won’t solve the country’s problems, but by definitions of the contemporary American spirit, it’s the recording I’ll be playing for my loved ones this 4th of July.

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MIDSUMMER’S MUSIC HONORS 20TH CENTURY COMPOSERS https://puroveinte.com/midsummers-music-honors-20th-century-composers/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 18:04:29 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/midsummers-music-honors-20th-century-composers/ Midsummer’s Music will continue its 2022 concert season with a inspiring program 20th century works classic english composers Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Charles Villiers Stanford. Featured Musicians include David Perry and Maynie Bradley, violin; Sally Chisholm and Allyson Fleck, alto; and James Waldo, cello. This program will be carried out June 167 p.m. […]]]>

Midsummer’s Music will continue its 2022 concert season with a inspiring program 20th century works classic english composers Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson, Ralph Vaughn Williams and Charles Villiers Stanford.

Featured Musicians include David Perry and Maynie Bradley, violin; Sally Chisholm and Allyson Fleck, alto; and James Waldo, cello. This program will be carried out June 167 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Sister Bay; June 195 p.m., at Woodwalk Gallery in Egg Harbor; June 21st5:00 p.m. at Historic Fish Creek Town Hall with one option post-concert dinner at Alexander; and June 237 p.m. at the Kress Pavilion in Egg Harbor.

Seasons third program will feature the Griffon String Quartet performing works by Dmitri Shostakovich and Felix Mendelssohn on June 247 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Sister Bay; June 257 p.m. at Hope United Church of Christ in Sturgeon Bay; June 26, 3 p.m., at the Moravian Church in Sister Bay; and June 30th7 p.m. at the Kress Pavilion in Egg Harbor.

Tickets are $35 per adult, $15 per student and free for children 12 and under. premium price apply for parlor/home concerts, dinner concerts and other special events. Order your tickets at midsummersmusic.com or by calling 920.854.7088.

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Shakira presents her new music video, is there a hidden message for Gerard Piqu? https://puroveinte.com/shakira-presents-her-new-music-video-is-there-a-hidden-message-for-gerard-piqu/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 04:11:00 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/shakira-presents-her-new-music-video-is-there-a-hidden-message-for-gerard-piqu/ Shakira released the song “Te Felicitowith Rauw Alejandro not long ago, and it’s one of the most streamed songs of 2022 so far. Now she’s collaborated again on another single that will surely continue to shine. Black Eyed Peas and David Guetta This time, Shakira has teamed up to collaborate on the song “Don’t You […]]]>

Shakira released the song “Te Felicitowith Rauw Alejandro not long ago, and it’s one of the most streamed songs of 2022 so far. Now she’s collaborated again on another single that will surely continue to shine.

Black Eyed Peas and David Guetta

This time, Shakira has teamed up to collaborate on the song “Don’t You Worry” with the Black Eyed Peas and David Guetta.

Seven million views on Youtube

Shakira has fun dancing with Nick Jonas after Pique split

The song already has more than seven million plays on YouTube, a platform that premiered the official video last Friday the 17th along with music apps like Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Musicto name a few.

The black Eyed Peas are known for their futuristic views on life as they have been doing since 2010, only this time they are making extraterrestrial contact.

Video Description

At the start of the video, the Black Eyed Peas are removed and later Shakira joins this type of UFO/Android women who are hypnotized by Shakira’s dance (and probably her hips, since they don’t lie).

They travel to another galaxy

They later confront the Black Eyed Peas, who then retreat with Shakira and an alien ship on an intergalactic journey.

Multi-city filming and editing

This video was shot in Spain and the United States, part of the video was shot in Los Angeles and later finished in Barcelona.

This is the first collaboration since 2020 for the two artists

Both Shakira and black-eyed peas hadn’t collaborated since December 2020 when they released the song Girls Like Me and it reached over 500 million views on YouTube. This hit earned a gold certification from the RIAA.

They are also joined by David Guettaone of the most recognized DJs in the world who collaborated years ago with the group Black Eyed Peas in the hit “I feel“, which was also a huge worldwide success.

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Two nights of music planned at Astley Park for the Chorley Flower Show 2022 https://puroveinte.com/two-nights-of-music-planned-at-astley-park-for-the-chorley-flower-show-2022/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:20:00 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/two-nights-of-music-planned-at-astley-park-for-the-chorley-flower-show-2022/ Following the success of the Mowtown Musical Evening, which accompanied last year’s Chorley Flower Show, two Musical Evenings are planned for this year’s event on Friday 29th and Saturday 30th July. Friday will see an evening of Irish music with fabulous local Irish folk bands, Meet the Folkers and Still Reeling while Saturday will see […]]]>

Following the success of the Mowtown Musical Evening, which accompanied last year’s Chorley Flower Show, two Musical Evenings are planned for this year’s event on Friday 29th and Saturday 30th July.

Friday will see an evening of Irish music with fabulous local Irish folk bands, Meet the Folkers and Still Reeling while Saturday will see a triumphant return of soul music with Let’s Drift and Chorley’s Got Soul DJ’s Paul K and Patti B for an evening of Motown and Soul of the North.

Tickets for Irish Night on Friday are £10 while Soul Night on Saturday is £15. A two-night ticket is available for £20*. The shows will take place in the Chorley Flower Show event area in the iconic Astley Park with doors opening at 6.30pm each evening.

More: Accrington school opens charging station as children focus on climate crisis

Councilor Peter Wilson, Deputy Leader of Chorley Council, said: “This weekend just keeps getting better, doesn’t it? Following the success of last year’s musical evening which attracted over 500 people, we wanted to go further and better this year and are now hosting two amazing evenings of entertainment.

“Chorley is the place to be the last weekend in July and I would encourage everyone to buy tickets quickly as they may sell out quickly! Daytime Chorley Flower Show tickets are also available – so go ahead, make it a weekend!

The Chorley Flower Show will take place from Friday 29th to Sunday 31st July. Musical events are also chargeable. Events are 18+ and a range of food and drink options will be available.

Tickets are available now at www.chorleyflowershow.com/tickets-2022

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The Grant Park Music Festival launches its 88th season https://puroveinte.com/the-grant-park-music-festival-launches-its-88th-season/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 20:27:53 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/the-grant-park-music-festival-launches-its-88th-season/ The Grant Park Music Festival starts on Wednesday Starting Wednesday evening, the Grant Park Music Festival kicks off its new season of free classical music concerts. CHICAGO – Starting Wednesday evening, the Grant Park Music Festival will kick off its 88th season. Until August 20, free concerts will take place every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday […]]]>

Starting Wednesday evening, the Grant Park Music Festival will kick off its 88th season.

Until August 20, free concerts will take place every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evening at the Pritzker Pavilion.

Most will include the Grant Park Symphony and the Grant Park Chorus.

“It’s a total treasure for the city, a total musical treasure,” said Festival CEO Paul Winberg.

“Having this and making it free is one of the greatest gifts not only to humanity if I may be so noble, but certainly to the city of Chicago,” said music lover Bleu Bettencourt, who listened to the rehearsal of the opening day of the symphony on Wednesday. afternoon.

The lawn can accommodate 7,000 people, the pavilion itself can accommodate 4,000 people.

Organizers say the only thing you need to do is prepare.

“Bring your picnics, bring your wine, bring your soft drinks — whatever helps you have a really enjoyable summer night in downtown Chicago,” Winberg said.

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If you don’t want to brave downtown traffic, this season 12 Festival performances will take place in neighborhoods across the city.

“It’s an incredible tradition in Chicago,” Winberg said. “There’s nothing else like it in the country.”

For the complete schedule, visit GPMF.org.

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Exploring the Rich History of African American Music at the First PS 114 Juneteenth Celebration https://puroveinte.com/exploring-the-rich-history-of-african-american-music-at-the-first-ps-114-juneteenth-celebration/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:58:11 +0000 https://puroveinte.com/exploring-the-rich-history-of-african-american-music-at-the-first-ps-114-juneteenth-celebration/ Students from PS 114 Ryder Elementary gave an all-star performance and a musical journey into the roots of African-American music from the 1700s to the present day in a performance titled “I See the Rhythm…a Juneteenth Celebration” during their first performance honoring the federal holiday held at the school auditorium located at 1077 Remsen Avenue […]]]>

Students from PS 114 Ryder Elementary gave an all-star performance and a musical journey into the roots of African-American music from the 1700s to the present day in a performance titled “I See the Rhythm…a Juneteenth Celebration” during their first performance honoring the federal holiday held at the school auditorium located at 1077 Remsen Avenue on Friday, June 10.

“Juneteenth just became a national holiday last year, so it’s pretty new,” said Natasha West, a performing arts and music teacher. “Students don’t really know why they aren’t in school that day, so it’s a way of using the arts to educate students.”

The Juneteenth explanation was explained in a video and a short play during the performance where a student said, “Wow, I can’t believe slavery ended on June 19, 1865, and it took two years for the news to reach the slaves in Texas.”, to which the other student replied, “That’s why Juneteenth is called ‘Freedom Day’ because it celebrates the liberation of the last slaves in the South.”

Juneteenth dates back to 1865 and commemorates the end of slavery, but it wasn’t until last year, June 17, 2021, that President Joe Biden made it a federal holiday to be celebrated on June 19.

Performances began from the earliest days of slavery with African spirituals, drums and percussion to rhythm and blues, swing, jazz, gospel and hip-hop – a rich history of contributions to the musical landscape American.

A solo blues performance of Etta James’ “At Last” by a student received loud cheers and applause from a grateful audience of her peers.

West, who has taught for nearly 20 years at PS 114, said there were 11 classes performing on the show and they learned their roles in about three months, with the solo performer learning his song in just one week.

She said that although the 4th of July was about the liberation of the United States, there were people who still didn’t have their civil rights, so she teaches civil rights, equality and fairness in America and watches things happening today. She explained how many students make connections to the past and present, and students ask, “Why do we still go through the same situations that happened so many years ago?” »

She wants kids to think about how we can change as a society and what they can do that can make a difference, because that’s how future leaders are formed.

“If you don’t show where we are, where we’re going, where we are, we don’t know what we need to change, so I think now these young leaders need to focus on how they can be the actors of change in society,” West said.

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