Bring back the music! Maine school destroyed by fire needs instruments

Following a devastating fire in June, pupils at Dike-Newell Elementary School in Bath are taking lessons at the vacant High Street Vocational Center this autumn. Students return to class on Tuesday, the day after Labor Day. A lot was lost in the fire, including almost everything in the K-2 music room. Music teacher Celina Reed tells WMTW that everything in the second-floor music room is considered a total loss, except for her ukulele, which was rescued by firefighters the next day. Reed just started teaching at Dike-Newall last year. She says the music teacher before her spent more than 30 years saving her budget to purchase and collect a variety of instruments, drums, percussion instruments and supplies for students. She says it’s not yet clear how much or if insurance will cover the loss of supplies and musical instruments, but she doesn’t expect everything to be replaced. For example, she says they lost a rosewood Orff bass xylophone that cost over $1,000. The district helped, and Reed says her class has egg shakers, a boomwhacker, and a drum for each student (a class set has about 20 instruments). She said she bought and cut pool noodles for the students to use as scratching instruments. Reed also says another teacher donated his childhood Beanie Babies to replace Reed’s that were lost in the fire. She says kindergarteners refer to Beanie Babies as beat buddies. And she says her family and friends have helped fund decorating the rooms to make the new space welcoming. For now, Reed says the school needs child-friendly instruments like tambourines, triangles, maracas, bells, rhythm sticks, roll-up keyboard pianos that can be placed on the floor, glockenspiels, mallets, and sound effect instruments (bell, vibra-slap, etc.) She also needs materials she can use to bring the music to life for children, such as finger puppets, crayons, modeling clay and pipe cleaners. She says individually these items are quite affordable, but together the cost is overwhelming. A GoFundMe page has been set up to raise money for the music room, and Reed says it’s the most convenient way for the community to help out as it will allow him to use the money to purchase music sets. instruments right away and keep track of what they have and what they still need. She says she is hesitant to accept donated band and orchestral instruments at this time because they are more durable instruments for these grade levels and she has no space to store them.

Following a devastating fire in June, pupils at Dike-Newell Elementary School in Bath are taking lessons at the vacant High Street Vocational Center this autumn. Students return to class on Tuesday, the day after Labor Day.

A lot was lost in the fire, including almost everything in the K-2 music room.

Music teacher Celina Reed tells WMTW that everything in the second-floor music room is considered a total loss, except for her ukulele, which was rescued by firefighters the next day.

Reed just started teaching at Dike-Newall last year. She says the music teacher before her spent more than 30 years saving her budget to purchase and collect a variety of instruments, drums, percussion instruments and supplies for students.

She says it’s not yet clear how much or if insurance will cover the loss of supplies and musical instruments, but she doesn’t expect everything to be replaced. For example, she says they lost a rosewood Orff bass xylophone that cost over $1,000.

The district helped, and Reed says her class has egg shakers, a boomwhacker, and a drum for each student (a class set has about 20 instruments). She said she bought and cut pool noodles for the students to use as scratching instruments.

Reed also says another teacher donated his childhood Beanie Babies to replace Reed’s that were lost in the fire. She says kindergarteners refer to Beanie Babies as beat buddies. And she says her family and friends have helped fund decorating the rooms to make the new space welcoming.

For now, Reed says the school needs child-friendly instruments like tambourines, triangles, maracas, bells, rhythm sticks, roll-up keyboard pianos that can be placed on the floor, glockenspiels, mallets, and sound effect instruments (bell, vibra-slap, etc.) She also needs materials she can use to bring the music to life for children, such as finger puppets, crayons, modeling clay and pipe cleaners. She says individually these items are quite affordable, but together the cost is overwhelming.

A GoFundMe page has been created to raise money for the music room, and Reed says it’s the most convenient way for the community to help because it will allow them to use the money to buy sets of instruments right away and keep track of what they have and what they still need.

She says she is hesitant to accept donated band and orchestral instruments at this time because they are more durable instruments for these grade levels and she has no space to store them.

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